SICB Division of Comparative Endocrinology (DCE)

On this page:


DCE Facebook Group

We encourage members to join our DCE Facebook group. This is a great place to post announcements about jobs, grants, meetings, and other items of interest to our integrative and comparative endocrinology community.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/104465249680261/


News and Announcements

Guidelines for applying for the Aubrey Gorbman competition for Best Student Oral Presentations.

Two awards will be given in the Best Student Presentation competition at the SICB Annual Meeting: one for the best oral presentation, the Aubrey Gorbman Award, and one for the best poster presentation, the Lynn Riddiford Award. In addition to a certificate, the winners will receive a cash prize. Students must be members of SICB. Students who have not yet been awarded a Ph.D. are eligible for these awards, as are new Ph.D.’s who have received the degree no more than 12 months prior to the meeting and are presenting a paper on their graduate research. The work must be original and must have been carried out principally by the student presenting the paper or the poster. In order to be considered for either competition (oral or poster), the Best Student Presentation Program box must be checked on the SICB abstract submission form.

The Aubrey Gorbman Award

DCE will group all the students competing for the Aubrey Gorbman Award in a single oral session. By the time the SICB Program Committee convenes to lay out the meeting schedule (late September or early October), a committee of 5 judges will have selected up to eight students for the oral competition. The committee will consist of judges chosen by the divisional Program Officer, who is the head judge (DPO.DCE@sicb.org).

Each student in the competition will give a 15 minute talk, including 3 minutes for questions. The 5-judge panel will attend all presentations and decide on a winner during the meeting. The winner will be announced at the DCE social.

Applicants not selected for the final oral competition will be contacted by the divisional Program Officer and given the option of giving an oral presentation during a regular session or presenting a poster and entering the Lynn Riddiford Best Student Poster Competition.

The Lynn Riddiford Award

The Lynn Riddiford Award competition for Best Student Poster Presentation will be open to all student applicants.




From the DCE Researchers Database

Stacia Sower

Molecular Evolution of the Neuroendocrine System
The research in my laboratory and with my collaborators and students emphasizes multidisciplinary approaches to studying the molecular and evolution of the neuroendocrine system in basal vertebrates. As an agnathan, the sea lamprey has become a model system for analysis of several systems including the evolution of the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction. Lampreys were identified in a pivotal position such that the mapping of the lamprey genome started in Jan 2005. For neuroendocrine studies the availability of the genome offers incredible opportunities for identification of ligands, receptors, transcription factors and signaling pathways. Our ongoing studies focus on the molecular, biochemical and functional studies of gonadotropin releasing hormone and glycoproteins such as gonadotroprin and respective receptors in lamprey to test the overall hypothesis that lamprey hormones and their receptor(s) share common functional and developmental features compared to later evolved vertebrates. The hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) system is considered to be a vertebrate innovation and seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral Agnathans. In spite of the very diverse patterns of life cycles and reproductive strategies and behaviors, this endocrine system is remarkably conserved throughout the Gnathostome lineages. We propose a modified paradigm in that the neuroendocrine control of reproduction and thyroid functions in the Agnathan sea lamprey exhibits an overlapping, simplified organization represented by one glycoprotein hormone putatively interacting with two receptors (see diagram above). Our working hypothesis is that the glycoprotein hormone/glycoprotein hormone receptor systems emerged as a link between the neuroendocrine and peripheral control levels during the early stages of Gnathostome divergence.


Click here for a complete listing of the DCE Researchers Database.




Howard Bern Lecturers

2002 - Howard Bern (inaugural, Anaheim Meeting)
2003 - Hubert Vaudry (Toronto Meeting)
2004 - Yoshi Nagahama (New Orleans Meeting)
2005 - Jim Truman (San Diego Meeting)
2006 - Stacia Sower (Orlando Meeting)
2007 - Nancy Sherwood (Phoenix Meeting)
2008 - Peter Thomas (San Antonio Meeting)
2009 - Peter Sharp (Boston Meeting)
2010 - Carl Schreck (Seattle Meeting)
2011 - John Wingfield (Salt Lake City Meeting)
2012 - Lynn Riddiford (Charleston Meeting)
2013 - Ellen Ketterson (San Francisco Meeting)
2014 - Louis J. Guillette, Jr. (Austin Meeting)
2015 - Randy Nelson (West Palm Beach Meeting)

The 2015 Bern Lecturer, Dr. Randy Nelson.


2016 - Elizabeth Adkins-Regan (Portland Meeting)

The 2016 Bern Lecturer, Dr. Elizabeth Adkins-Regan.

2017 - David Crews (New Orleans Meeting)



The Howard A. Bern Lecture, which each year highlights the work of an influential comparative endocrinologist, has been an excellent forum for presenting the newest breakthroughs and synthetic themes in the field. This lecture is named in recognition of one of the founding fathers of Comparative Endocrinology and a member of the National Academy of Science.

Donate to the Howard A. Bern Endowment Fund
This fund began with an initial contribution by Elsevier, publisher of General and Comparative Endocrinology, but donations are needed to ensure the continuation of this vital part of the SICB annual meeting. All proceeds from the fund will be used exclusively to support the lecture. Contributions can be made at:
https://ssl4.westserver.net/birenheide/secure/sicb/cart/donations.php





Meetings