Meeting Abstract

P2-266  Friday, Jan. 5 15:30 - 17:30  Effects of Physical Activity on Behavior in House Crickets TANNER, MK*; SANDERS, EJ; IBRAHIM, O; BUBAK, AN; LAILVAUX, S; SWALLOW, JG; GREENWOOD, BN; University of Colorado Denver; University of Colorado Denver; University of Colorado Denver; University of Colorado Anshutz Medical Campus; University of New Orleans; University of Colorado Denver; University of Colorado Denver margaret.tanner@ucdenver.edu

Physical activity in mammals has been shown to modulate behaviors important for survival by acting on monoamine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine. Monoaminergic systems are present in invertebrate species; however, little is known about the effects of physical activity on monoamine-dependent survival behaviors in non-mammalian species. In the common house cricket Acheta domesticus, the norepinephrine analog octopamine is involved with experience-dependent changes in survival behaviors, such as aggressive behavior and bite-force. Here we investigated the effects of physical activity on bite-force in male and female common house crickets. Crickets were exercised by placement in rotating tubes at various speeds (160 cm/min, 260 cm/min, 360 cm/min) and duration. Control crickets were placed in stationary tubes for equal amounts of time. Initial results reveal that physical activity at a rate of 260 cm/min optimally increases bite force. The duration of physical activity that optimally increases bite force is still being analyzed. Follow-up studies will incorporate the chosen speed and duration to verify these initial results and determine the effect of physical activity on monoaminergic systems in house crickets.